Top Christmas treats for pets

 

Eight out of 10 pet owners plan to gift their furry friends more that a bone for Christmas. They will give them jumpers, jackets, advent calendars, and animal-friendly festive meals.

 

A survey of 2,000 cat and dog owners found 23 per cent have bought their pet more presents than their partner this year – totalling an average spend of £31.30.

 

15% will find a Christmas dinner fit for a King to pamper their pet.

 

A hopeful 13% have even purchased their pet a festive jumper to wear for the big day. However, only 38% believe they will be willing to wear it.

 

35% believe their pet or dog would be hesitant about wearing a novelty Santa hat.

 

Neil Rogers, from M&S Pet Insurance, which commissioned the research, said: “The results of our study show we’re willing to go the extra mile for our furry friends.

 

“Christmas is a time to treat the ones we love, and to show our family and friends how much they mean to us.

 

“It’s great to see that our pets, who bring us so much joy day-to-day, are included in this special time of the year.”

 

75% of respondents also considered their pet dog or cat a significant member of the family.

 

79% of pet owners get joy seeing their furry companions happy and living the best lives possible.

 

You can also expect a new bed, a nice collar, and toys for your pet this Christmas.

 

31 percent don’t have any pet insurance.

After the Covid 19 pandemic, the Guide Dog’s national breeding centre in Leamington Spa has been forced to close its breeding program. This means that they are facing one of their busiest Christmases. SWNS story SWBRpuppies. The Guide Dogs’ National Breeding Centre is preparing for one of its busiest Christmas periods on record after Covid-19 forced a halt to its breeding programme for the first time in more than half a century. The charity was forced to suspend activity for three months after March, when the UK was struck by the first pandemic wave. Every hour, a person in the UK becomes blind. With two million people with sight loss, this service is more in demand than ever. As a result, the centre is now in the process of raising more than 100 puppies under seven weeks old, with the dogs embarking on a life-changing ‘career’ helping people with sight loss to live the life they choose.

 

Be prepared

The top reason for not purchasing pet insurance is the perceived cost of the policy, while others feel they won’t need it.

 

15% feel it is too difficult for their pets to have coverage.

 

Separate research from the Association of British Insurers revealed the average veterinary bill, for any animal in 2021, cost £848.

 

The M&S Pet Insurance study found that, in the event of such a bill, just 51 per cent of pet owners would be in a comfortable position to pay it.

 

45 percent of pet owners have had to deal with an unexpected pet emergency at some point in their lives.

 

It also emerged the average pet family will have three unexpected vet bills on average over the course of their pet’s lifetime, totting up to £344.

 

Neil Rogers added: “Taking out insurance – and selecting a policy that’s right for you and your pet – can provide peace of mind for pet owners.

 

“This is especially worth considering at this time of year, when there are often more potential pet hazards around the home, like baubles, tinsel, chocolates, candy canes and more.”

Tips from Kirsty Cavill (Head Nurse at Vetfone) to keep your pet safe this Christmas

 

FESTIVE FOODS YOU SHOULD AVOID

Dogs and cats can be allergic to traditional Christmas treats such as mince pies, chocolate, and Christmas cake.

 

The same applies to presents under the tree that contain food. Even the best-behaved pet may be tempted to investigate.

 

FEELING THIRSTY

Don’t let your pet drink the water from the base of the Christmas tree – Fertiliser in the soil means it could be harmful.

 

PRICKLY PAWS

Real Christmas trees are well known for shedding their needles as soon as you bring them home, check your pet’s paws regularly to make sure no pesky pines have become stuck in there.

 

FESTIVE FOLIAGE

Many of the plants that we bring into our homes during this time of year can pose a problem for our pets.

 

Any poinsettia, holly, mistletoe and ivy should be kept out of your pet’s reach to ensure they aren’t tempted to take a closer look.

 

LOOK BUT DON’T TOUCH

Our pets are curious creatures who love to explore the world around them. They are often tempted to play in baubles and tinsel during the holiday season.

 

However, if they are ingested, they can cause blockages in your pet’s system and make them very sick. So be careful not to let them play with their paws.

Top festive treats to give your Brit pet

1.            A new toy

2.            Some new treats

3.            Presents wrapped securely so that family members can open them.

4.            Enjoy a night of cuddling up and watching a festive movie

5.            Eating Christmas dinner as a family

6.            A new bed

7.            A new collar

8.            Cooking a Christmas dinner that is special and animal-friendly for them

9.            An advent calendar

10.         A Christmas jumper

11.         A new winter jacket for cold walks

12.         A Christmas card

13.         Pet-friendly tipple

14.         A vacation to a pet-friendly destination

15.         Take them to a Christmas dinner.

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