60year

60year

Dr Jane Goodall celebrates record-breaking 60-year study with immersive online experience


World renowned British ethologist and conservationist, Dr Jane Goodall, Founder of the Jane Goodall Institute & UN Messenger of Peace, celebrates record-breaking 60-year study with immersive online experience

The 14th July, World Chimpanzee Day, marks 60 years since trailblazer, Dr Jane Goodall first arrived in Gombe national park in Tanzania, to begin her ground-breaking study of wild chimpanzees. Thanks to students and field staff of the Gombe Stream Research Centre that study continues today, funded through the Jane Goodall Institute (JGI), and has been awarded a Guinness World Record for the longest running study of Wild Chimpanzees.

To commemorate this achievement JGI is presenting a brand new storymap, created in partnership with Esri and Blue Raster, which showcases the tremendous contributions and living legacy of Dr. Jane Goodall, JGI, and the Gombe chimpanzees. It includes stories, information about the research, and our conservation efforts through Tacare – JGI’s method of community-based conservation and conservation science.

This new storymap gives audiences a unique experience of the contributions of this special place of discovery with interactive maps, intimate photos, and an immersive roadmap taking participants on a journey spanning 60 years, from the time Dr Jane first arrived in Gombe, through the development of the research centre and work of researchers, and the development of Tacare. How amazing that we are still learning new facts about these chimpanzees and their environment today.

Gombe is a living laboratory, home to the world’s most studied group of wild chimpanzees’ says Dr Goodall ‘but the impact of our work there is far greater than one species or one forest. The results of our research, and the collaborative approach we take in our programmes show how humans, other animals and the environment are intrinsically connected.

Dr. Goodall’s ground-breaking discoveries at Gombe redefined scientific perception of our relationship with the rest of the animal kingdom. Dr. Goodall’s story inspired many young women to pursue a career in science and she continues to influence millions of individuals, institutions, and organisations around the world.

Over 250 researchers from Tanzania and many other countries have conducted studies in Gombe many of whom have gone on to work at major universities and other institutions all over the globe. And they, in turn, have inspired others to follow similar careers. The research has resulted in some 50 PhD and Masters degrees.

Jane first set foot in Gombe at age 26. One of her breakthrough discoveries, that Chimpanzees make and use tools, is considered one of the greatest scientific contributions of the 20th century. Today, at 86, Dr. Goodall continues to work tirelessly, currently operating from her home in Bournemouth instead of her usual 300 days-a-year global travel. Her mission is to raise awareness about the harm humans are doing to the planet, raise funds, and to give her reasons for hope that we can still turn things around.

‘I was 10 years old when I decided I would go to Africa and live with wild animals. But I was told I could not possibly do this as I was ‘just a girl’ and we had little money” But my mother always said, “If you really want something, you’re going to have to work hard, [you’ll have to] take advantage of every opportunity but don’t give up.” I’ve taken that message to young people all around the world.”

You can hear these stories and more in her own words as Dr. Goodall takes you on a journey of discovery through her childhood dreams of living alongside wildlife, first steps in Gombe, greatest revelations, and her reasons for hope that we can save the planet if we get together and take action now https://bit.ly/GombeStoryMap
Dr. Goodall will also be participating in a virtual event at St. James Piccadilly (sp) on 22nd July at 7:30 p.m. https://bit.ly/22JulyVirtualLiveEvent

Images, with credits: https://bit.ly/Gombe60PhotoswithCredits

The Jane Goodall Institute (UK) promotes education & research of wildlife & conservation by scientific research of wild chimpanzees sanctuaries for wild chimpanzees orphaned or illegally captured. Jane Goodall’s Roots & Shoots is the Jane Goodall Institute humanitarian and conservation programme empowering young people of all ages to become involved in hands-on projects for their community, animals and the environment and is now active in more than 65 countries. For further information about Gombe, the programmes of the Jane Goodall Institute and how to support our work visit www.janegoodall.org.uk and www.rootsnshoots.org.uk

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