GREAT

GREAT

Jeffrey Daniel (Shalamar) Releases Anti-Hate Song – Make Love Great Again


Make Love Great Again is a track written to provide an antidote to the culture of hate that has been perpetuated by political leaders of recent times. The world is in flames, and now seems the opportune moment to release a song that has a positive message of hope. The catchy track is reminiscent of Pharrell’s “Happy”, but with added cutting political edge. Bringing people together is the theme, reuniting divided nations and focusing on love and compassion is the message.

Jeffrey has been moved by the traumatic events of the past few weeks, the slaying of Ahmaud Arbery, the murder of George Floyd and the many ongoing injustices around the planet. The world needs to change. Governments need to make positive moves to eliminate police brutality, social injustice and discrimination. People need to work together as one human family to make a better world.

“I have lived a very extraordinary life on different continents, and I have learned that basically all people aspire for a common universal commodity …. love. If we make love great again, we will all be great.“ Jeffrey Daniel

All funds from download sales of Make Love Great Again will raise funds for groups fighting for racial equality and social Justice. The song is available at most online retailers from June 15th
.
Hate Divides – Love Unites
Heal The World
Make Love Great Again

Biography

Jeffrey Daniel – has sold over 25 million records with Shalamar. He is the man who taught Michael Jackson the moonwalk and introduced body-popping to Europe and the UK. Jeffrey co-choreographed and featured in the “Smooth Criminal” and “Bad” videos during a creative partnership with The King of Pop that spanned twenty years. They were dance brothers in the spotlight and cousins in real life. Jeffrey showcased the backslide on US TV in 1979 and did the same for UK audiences in 1982. The backslide was renamed by MJ to become an iconic move. JD gained recognition from a young age as one of the most popular dancers on the US TV program Soul Train before presenting the UK version of the show – the 6.20 Soul Train. He went on to star in the original West End production of Andrew Lloyd Webber’s Starlight Express, playing Electra. A legendary performer and style icon. Since 1999 JD &
Howard have been performing as Shalamar, with Carolyn Griffey joining them in 2001.

Credits
Written, performed, and produced by Jeffrey Daniel.

Website
www.jeffreydaniel.com

Source link

As Home Energy Usage Spikes by 30% During Lockdown – 85% of Brits Unaware Of Their Electricity Usage – SaveMoneyCutCarbon.com Energy & Water Survey Of Great Britain


As lockdown measures in the UK persist due to the COVID-19 pandemic, a clear knock-on effect is that people are using more energy and water at home.

In fact, midday energy usage is currently spiking by 30% as a result of people working, educating, feeding and entertaining themselves from home, according to energy company, Ovo, while Bulb reports a 27% midday surge.

Meanwhile, more than a million households have been given help in the form of ‘time to pay’ with their energy bills due to coronavirus, according to The Telegraph

Yet, according to the SaveMoneyCutCarbon.com Energy & Water Survey of Great Britain 2020, 85% of Brits seem to be totally unaware of their yearly electricity usage

This is the first phase of a 5 year ongoing survey, designed to track the usage of energy and water in the home, homeowners’ awareness of how to reduce their usage, and the impact this can have on their carbon footprint. The survey asks a wide range of questions about how people understand and manage their energy and water at home

The survey is taking snapshots every six months across a wider 60 month online survey and in the first phase there were 2,633 respondents that completed the detailed questionnaire

The statistics show Brits are somewhat oblivious in particular of their energy consumption, flying in the face of the fact that 66.4% of people surveyed were actively using smart meters in their homes to monitor their energy usage

“Clearly there needs to be more education, and more attention to the finer detail of how to cut down on energy consumption as well as reducing carbon output and it must raise the question if the hugely costly roll out or smart meters is actually benefiting the consumer, are households actually looking at the meters in their houses, or are the real winner the energy companies in making collecting their billing information easier and lower cost.”, according to SaveMoneyCutCarbon CEO Mark Sait

The SaveMoneyCutCarbon Survey shows a mixture of positive and negative impact

In terms of electricity usage:

  • 25.8% don’t leave any phones, laptops or tablets on charge overnight.
  • 50.7% leave laptops on charge while working.
  • 87.9% don’t leave any lamp on overnight.
  • 76.6% don’t use a tumble dryer in the summer.
  • 42.6% set their fridge to 3 (with 5 being the coldest)
  • Only 4.4% of people surveyed leave more than five devices to charge overnight

In terms of water usage:

  • 62.6% don’t take baths. Of those that do 30.6% run a single bath every day.
  • 73.2% shower for less than 10 minutes a day.
  • 78.4% turn the tap off while brushing their teeth. A running tap will use 6 litres per minute of water.
  • 70.1% turn the tap off while washing up, rather than letting it run.
  • 29.1% have a water butt installed on taps – saving on watering the garden and washing the car

In terms of gas usage:

  • 78.9% burn gas.
  • 55.1% run a combi boiler

“Clearly, Britain is heading in the right direction,” says Sait. “The country is shifting from conspicuous and unconscious consumption of energy and water to one that understands, conserves and reduces mentality,” he says

“Now that people are spending time at home more than ever, it’s never been as important as it is now for homeowners to think carefully about how they use energy and water in their home.

“There’s very little doubt that homes across the UK will be facing larger energy and water bills this year than they’re used to” according to Sait. “It also means a significant increase in their carbon footprint – and this comes at a time when many households’ income is going to be squeezed due to the COVID-19 situation.

“Figures from this initial phase of our survey demonstrate that people are making a conscious effort to reduce their energy and water usage, but there are far more things they can change which will have a positive impact on their usage, their bills whilst reducing their carbon footprint.” Sait states.

SaveMoneyCutCarbon.com works hard to promote ways in which everyday people, and business owners, can help educate and support customers who want to use energy and water in more sustainable ways but without having to compromise often associated with carbon reduction or going green. They call it ‘Sustainability Without Compromise’.

While government initiatives over the years have strived to help people save money and to respect their environment, Sait and his team are concerned such initiatives focus too much on the negative

“People are less willing to commit to big changes than they are to minor adjustments – which are obvious – especially in the present economic situation focusing on the saving money must come first with the carbon as a welcome by product. ”.

“Simple, everyday changes such as LED lighting or eco showers and taps can make a huge difference to how much people pay every time they turn on a light or use water in their house – start with simple things is Sait’s message, as lots of little changes can make a big difference to your pocket and the environment.

Some householders are embracing the benefits of LED lighting, for instance, which reduces electricity consumption by typically up to 80%, with more than half 52% of respondents saying that they have LEDs in their homes.

For further information, please contact John Price at 6 Hillgrove PR. Email. john.price@6hillgrovepr.com; Mobile. 07968 476 241.

About SaveMoneyCutCarbon

SaveMoneyCutCarbon’s customers have saved over 727 million litres of water and 23 million kWh of energy, delivering a carbon reduction of 6,765 tonnes per annum from completed projects and products sold on its online platform. The carbon reduction alone is equivalent to travelling 23.24 million miles in an average petrol car.

SaveMoneyCutCarbon was established in 2012 with a goal to build a new single “go-to” platform for homes and organizations who want to reduce their energy and water consumption while improving their carbon footprint and sustainability credentials.

Based in Bury St Edmunds, it employs and develops local staff while delivering projects across the UK.  It provides its growing customer base a one-stop-shop: from learning how savings can be made across each building type, to helping deliver on this from a single online order, to delivery of the largest retrofit projects across the UK.

The company has recently been selected as the NHS Sustainability Supplier of the Year for their energy saving works with Cambridge University Hospitals’ world famous Addenbrooke’s Hospital.

About Mark Sait CEO

Mark has been described more than once, as a “disruptive entrepreneur” as much of his experience is in identifying and starting businesses that simplifying fragmented markets to help move new technologies or solutions into the mainstream.

SaveMoneyCutCarbon is his latest venture, the company is now recognised as the “go to people for homes and organisations that want to reduce their energy and water bills”. The business has enjoyed rapid growth and now delivers its customers millions of pounds in savings per year, through its UK wide project management and installation teams, and through its website. Mark writes columns for various publications and is often asked to comment on carbon reduction, energy and water matters for various press & TV.

Survey Infographic 

Please click below to download:

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1yCyR8Re284cNLgBWLJ0Ogs_wWHJoasyn/view?usp=sharing

Full Data Table of SaveMoneyCutCarbon.com Energy & Water Survey of Great Britain 2020:

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1jHJmXw9XmkwmPxVofd12TTi2jLdCSl4_

Image of Mark Sait, SaveMoneyCutCarbon.com:

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1dvf3kbhTEQMxs1XmqmqHgH8m8XO4v7Z8/view

 

Source link

NUTRITION EDUCATION IS A GREAT ABSENTEE IN THE CURRICULUM OF EUROPEAN DOCTORS


ESPEN LAUNCHES THE EUROPEAN MANIFESTO TO FILL THE TRAINING GAP

Nice, January 22 2020 – “During the medical training at the University the students should receive mandatory information about human nutrition in its three different domains, including basic nutrition, applied or public health nutrition and clinical nutrition”, as indicated in the “Manifesto for the Implementation of Nutrition Education” just released in Nice during the ESPEN-NEMS meeting.

“The way to organise these themes in the curriculum, also including novel teaching tools, internet resources and e-learning, will depend on each University centre, taking into consideration the different possible models of teaching (parallel, integrated or case-solving based), the availability of teachers and the distribution of time and credits with the rest of teaching subjects” the Manifesto says.

Although the teaching of nutrition is an essential element of medical training, a recent survey (1) has shown that there is an extreme variability in the educational standards of this subject in medical schools worldwide. As a consequence, there are differences in the access and quality of treatments received by patients.

Worldwide, more than 2 billion adults are overweight, 600 million obese and 462 million malnourished. These conditions contribute to 60% of cardiovascular death and 35% of tumor death. Even less known is that 35% of hospitalised patients develop disease-related malnutrition, a real ‘disease in a disease’.

“Weight loss in chronic, oncological, elderly and frail patients is an underestimated and under-diagnosed problem” Professor Rocco Barazzoni, ESPEN Chairman, explains. “Loss of weight and muscle mass leads to a higher rate of complications, worse response to therapies, higher mortality and increase in healthcare expenditures. This occurs in spite of the well documented positive and cost-effective impact of nutritional therapy on treatment side effects and disease outcomes.

“Implementing training is urgent” echoes Professor Maurizio Muscaritoli, Coordinator of the NEMS initiative together with the Spanish Professor Cristina Cuerda. “Learning nutrition is mandatory for future doctors. Seeking political support, forming ad hoc committees for the development of curricula and teaching modalities are among the key factors to allow for the implementation of nutrition training in universities”.

“Nutrition education in undergraduate medical schools is heterogeneous and largely under-powered” Professor Cuerda says, and adds: “teachers and students believe that the time dedicated to nutrition teaching is insufficient and far from what would be needed”.

The recently published ESPEN position paper (2) has identified the “minimum curriculum knowledge” in nutrition that serves to improve the training of the future doctors. This has been transferred into the Manifesto which was issued and signed by the 51 participants, including delegates of 13 European Medical Schools, representing 34 countries.

1. Cuerda et al – A clinical nutrition education in medical schools: results of an ESPEN survey – Clin Nutr (2017);36:915-6
2. Cuerda et al – Nutrition education in medical schools (NEMS). An ESPEN position paper – Clinical Nutrition (2019); 38: 969-974

ESPEN (European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism) is an organization dedicated to all issues relevant to the field of clinical nutrition and metabolism and promotes: basic and clinical research, basic and advanced education and organization of consensus statements about clinical care and care quality control.
NEMS is an initiative of the ESPEN Nutrition Education Study Group (NESG)

Press Office NEMS Manifesto
Mrs. Johanna Rossi Mason
Mason&Partners
Mobile 0039-347-2626993
jrossimason@gmail.com
Rome – Italy

NUTRITION EDUCATION IN MEDICAL SCHOOLS (NEMS) INITIATIVE

Manifesto for the Implementation of Nutrition Education
in the Undergraduate Medical Currriculum

The NEMS Manifesto

Nutrition is a broad, interdisciplinary field, encompassing a large variety of scientific, cultural, social and political aspects. Human Nutrition is identified by three major domains, namely Basic, Applied and Clinical Nutrition. Human nutrition is an intrinsically complex topic, ranging from agriculture and zootechnics to food technology, from nutrition in different physiological states (growth, pregnancy, breast-feeding, aging), to the nutritional approach to acute and chronic diseases, from birth to the end of life.

At present, and due to its innate complexity, the nutritional field is often dominated by confusion: researchers, clinicians, patients and media have inconsistent ideas related to nutritional issues in health and disease. The complexity of the matter and the apparent confusion, however, should not represent an obstacle in acknowledging the relevance of nutrition in both preventive and clinical medicine.

The prevalence of obesity and related complications and the mortality rates due to NCDs such as cardiovascular diseases, cancer, diabetes or COPD are steadily increasing and cause > 60% of diseases burden. Conversely, the rates of disease-related malnutrition (under-nutrition) have remained substantially unchanged since the 1970s. Malnutrition still causes high rates of complications, mortality and healthcare costs and about 12% or more of hospital expenditure.

While research has clearly documented that nutrition can positively impact on disease onset, prognosis, treatment side effects and outcomes, there is a great neglect regarding the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of malnutrition (including over- and under-nutrition) and low priority is currently given to nutritional activities by other disciplines in the competition for healthcare budget.

The training of healthcare professionals (HCPs), and in particular of medical doctors, becomes crucial both for a correct take-up of the problem and for effectively combating the confounding environment that prevails in the domains of Human Nutrition. Currently, (Clinical) Nutrition education in undergraduate Medical Schools is heterogeneous and largely underpowered.

Medical students are trained to consider the scientific evidence for pharmaceutical decision-making and clinical guidelines promoted by scientific institutions in specialties such as cardiology or surgery, while the evidence for nutritional interventions and the guidelines in Clinical Nutrition are often underevaluated.

ESPEN
NUTRITION EDUCATION IN MEDICAL SCHOOLS (NEMS) INITIATIVE*
Manifesto for the Implementation of Nutrition Education
in the Undergraduate Medical Currriculum
The NEMS Manifesto

Based on the previous arguments, we manifest that:

• Nutrition education is necessary in the training of healthcare professionals, including medical students and should be mandatory in all Medical Schools

• Medical students need an evidence-based nutrition education to understand the importance of nutrition in health and disease

• During the medical training at the University the students should receive mandatory information about human nutrition in its three different domains, including basic nutrition, applied or public health nutrition and clinical nutrition

• The way to organise these themes in the curriculum (i.e. vertical or horizontal integration of traditional classes, seminars and/or clinical practice sessions), also including novel teaching tools, internet resources and e-learning, will depend on each University centre, taking into consideration the different possible models of teaching (parallel, integrated or case-solving based), the availability of teachers and the distribution of time and credits with the rest of teaching subjects.

https://www.prfire.com/https://www.prfire.com/

Source link

NUTRITION EDUCATION IS A GREAT ABSENTEE IN THE CURRICULUM OF EUROPEAN DOCTORS

ESPEN LAUNCHES THE EUROPEAN MANIFESTO TO FILL THE TRAINING GAP

Nice, January 22 2020 – “During the medical training at the University the students should receive mandatory information about human nutrition in its three different domains, including basic nutrition, applied or public health nutrition and clinical nutrition”, as indicated in the “Manifesto for the Implementation of Nutrition Education” just released in Nice during the ESPEN-NEMS meeting.

“The way to organise these themes in the curriculum, also including novel teaching tools, internet resources and e-learning, will depend on each University centre, taking into consideration the different possible models of teaching (parallel, integrated or case-solving based), the availability of teachers and the distribution of time and credits with the rest of teaching subjects” the Manifesto says.

Although the teaching of nutrition is an essential element of medical training, a recent survey (1) has shown that there is an extreme variability in the educational standards of this subject in medical schools worldwide. As a consequence, there are differences in the access and quality of treatments received by patients.

Worldwide, more than 2 billion adults are overweight, 600 million obese and 462 million malnourished. These conditions contribute to 60% of cardiovascular death and 35% of tumor death. Even less known is that 35% of hospitalised patients develop disease-related malnutrition, a real ‘disease in a disease’.

“Weight loss in chronic, oncological, elderly and frail patients is an underestimated and under-diagnosed problem” Professor Rocco Barazzoni, ESPEN Chairman, explains. “Loss of weight and muscle mass leads to a higher rate of complications, worse response to therapies, higher mortality and increase in healthcare expenditures. This occurs in spite of the well documented positive and cost-effective impact of nutritional therapy on treatment side effects and disease outcomes.

“Implementing training is urgent” echoes Professor Maurizio Muscaritoli, Coordinator of the NEMS initiative together with the Spanish Professor Cristina Cuerda. “Learning nutrition is mandatory for future doctors. Seeking political support, forming ad hoc committees for the development of curricula and teaching modalities are among the key factors to allow for the implementation of nutrition training in universities”.

“Nutrition education in undergraduate medical schools is heterogeneous and largely under-powered” Professor Cuerda says, and adds: “teachers and students believe that the time dedicated to nutrition teaching is insufficient and far from what would be needed”.

The recently published ESPEN position paper (2) has identified the “minimum curriculum knowledge” in nutrition that serves to improve the training of the future doctors. This has been transferred into the Manifesto which was issued and signed by the 51 participants, including delegates of 13 European Medical Schools, representing 34 countries.

1. Cuerda et al – A clinical nutrition education in medical schools: results of an ESPEN survey – Clin Nutr (2017);36:915-6
2. Cuerda et al – Nutrition education in medical schools (NEMS). An ESPEN position paper – Clinical Nutrition (2019); 38: 969-974

ESPEN (European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism) is an organization dedicated to all issues relevant to the field of clinical nutrition and metabolism and promotes: basic and clinical research, basic and advanced education and organization of consensus statements about clinical care and care quality control.
NEMS is an initiative of the ESPEN Nutrition Education Study Group (NESG)

Press Office NEMS Manifesto
Mrs. Johanna Rossi Mason
Mason&Partners
Mobile 0039-347-2626993
jrossimason@gmail.com
Rome – Italy

NUTRITION EDUCATION IN MEDICAL SCHOOLS (NEMS) INITIATIVE

Manifesto for the Implementation of Nutrition Education
in the Undergraduate Medical Currriculum

The NEMS Manifesto

Nutrition is a broad, interdisciplinary field, encompassing a large variety of scientific, cultural, social and political aspects. Human Nutrition is identified by three major domains, namely Basic, Applied and Clinical Nutrition. Human nutrition is an intrinsically complex topic, ranging from agriculture and zootechnics to food technology, from nutrition in different physiological states (growth, pregnancy, breast-feeding, aging), to the nutritional approach to acute and chronic diseases, from birth to the end of life.

At present, and due to its innate complexity, the nutritional field is often dominated by confusion: researchers, clinicians, patients and media have inconsistent ideas related to nutritional issues in health and disease. The complexity of the matter and the apparent confusion, however, should not represent an obstacle in acknowledging the relevance of nutrition in both preventive and clinical medicine.

The prevalence of obesity and related complications and the mortality rates due to NCDs such as cardiovascular diseases, cancer, diabetes or COPD are steadily increasing and cause > 60% of diseases burden. Conversely, the rates of disease-related malnutrition (under-nutrition) have remained substantially unchanged since the 1970s. Malnutrition still causes high rates of complications, mortality and healthcare costs and about 12% or more of hospital expenditure.

While research has clearly documented that nutrition can positively impact on disease onset, prognosis, treatment side effects and outcomes, there is a great neglect regarding the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of malnutrition (including over- and under-nutrition) and low priority is currently given to nutritional activities by other disciplines in the competition for healthcare budget.

The training of healthcare professionals (HCPs), and in particular of medical doctors, becomes crucial both for a correct take-up of the problem and for effectively combating the confounding environment that prevails in the domains of Human Nutrition. Currently, (Clinical) Nutrition education in undergraduate Medical Schools is heterogeneous and largely underpowered.

Medical students are trained to consider the scientific evidence for pharmaceutical decision-making and clinical guidelines promoted by scientific institutions in specialties such as cardiology or surgery, while the evidence for nutritional interventions and the guidelines in Clinical Nutrition are often underevaluated.

ESPEN
NUTRITION EDUCATION IN MEDICAL SCHOOLS (NEMS) INITIATIVE*
Manifesto for the Implementation of Nutrition Education
in the Undergraduate Medical Currriculum
The NEMS Manifesto

Based on the previous arguments, we manifest that:

• Nutrition education is necessary in the training of healthcare professionals, including medical students and should be mandatory in all Medical Schools

• Medical students need an evidence-based nutrition education to understand the importance of nutrition in health and disease

• During the medical training at the University the students should receive mandatory information about human nutrition in its three different domains, including basic nutrition, applied or public health nutrition and clinical nutrition

• The way to organise these themes in the curriculum (i.e. vertical or horizontal integration of traditional classes, seminars and/or clinical practice sessions), also including novel teaching tools, internet resources and e-learning, will depend on each University centre, taking into consideration the different possible models of teaching (parallel, integrated or case-solving based), the availability of teachers and the distribution of time and credits with the rest of teaching subjects.

https://www.prfire.com/https://www.prfire.com/

Source link