Skills

Skills

Infinity Works partners with Generation to tackle demand for digital skills


Leading UK digital transformation consultancy Infinity Works has announced an exciting new partnership with global youth employment non-profit organisation, Generation UK & Ireland, to help support unemployed youths and plug the UK digital skills gap.

Building upon its successful in-house data engineering Academy, Infinity Works has worked with Generation to design a unique free 12-week programme that supports young people, who are either unemployed or come from an underprivileged background, start a career in tech.

The course, focused on data engineering, is being delivered remotely and contains an extensive blend of programming and employment training to prepare students for a future role in industry. Using its extensive network, Generation will connect students with employers across the UK struggling to fill entry-level digital roles.

Clement Pickering, Director of Academy at Infinity Works, said: “We’re both proud and excited to be partnering with Generation to help support young people get their first foot on the tech career ladder. During the last 12 months, we’ve seen a growing demand for data skills that enable businesses to build meaningful solutions that unlock value. Tech businesses in the UK have an important role to play in educating and empowering young people so that they have the skills to help bridge the widening UK digital skills gap.”

Michael Houlihan, CEO of Generation, said: “We’re delighted to launch this pioneering Data Engineering programme in partnership with Infinity Works. Infinity Works are a market leader with deep expertise in the field, plus one of a growing list of companies from Leeds making an important contribution to the wider UK tech sector.

“We’re looking forward to helping hundreds, if not thousands, of young people land their dream jobs in the UK tech sector, widening access to these exciting careers to people that may not otherwise have had the opportunity, and addressing the UK digital skills gap all at once. The response from young people, employers, and policy makers has been fantastic, and we’re excited to get going with programmes in London, Manchester, and Birmingham in 2020, and more cities to follow in 2021.”

The data engineering programme is open to people aged 18 to 29 and aren’t currently in education, training, or stable employment. The first cohort included people from the Birmingham area with another programme underway in Central London. The course is also currently open to people from Manchester with more locations planned for the future.

As part of the collaboration, Infinity Works will provide instructors and the technical content, with Generation adding expertise and content around wider professional skills and connecting graduates with employers in the tech sector.

Anyone interested in joining the programme can find out more by visiting: https://uk.generation.org/

According to research from The Resolution Foundation, an additional 600,000 18-24-year-olds could be unemployed this year as a result of the coronavirus crisis.

Infinity Works has trained 55 people through its own Academy and placed them in full-time employment in digital roles.

Infinity Works has offices in Manchester, Leeds, London and Edinburgh

About Infinity Works

Infinity Works is one of the UK’s leading digital transformation consultancies, as recognised by the Financial Times. From tier-one retail to financial services, and in some of the largest digital-led projects in national government, we enable the country’s most recognised brands to digitally transform. With more than 400 highly-skilled people, we consult with our customers on the best way to achieve tech-driven transformation through services including full-stack engineering, cloud, data, and mobile. Learn more at infinityworks.com.

About Generation

Generation is a not-for-profit social enterprise that deliver programmes to recruit, train and place young people into work. Our projects deliver a proven return on investment (ROI) for both employers and young people. Having launching 2015, we have quickly become one of the world’s largest demand led youth employment programme. We have placed 36,000 young people into roles, working with over 2,000 employer partners to date across 12 countries and 26 professions.

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Closing the digital talent gap – how to develop tech skills


One of the biggest challenges faced by businesses today is a shortage of employees with tech skills. In the UK alone, research shows that 11.3 million people don’t have a complete range of basic digital skills while 4.3 million people have none.

As the technology ecosystem rapidly expands and businesses invest in new innovations to increase competitive advantage, it’s crucial that efforts are made to close this gap and train the workforce of the future. But how can that be done?

Tech skills are paramount

The recent coronavirus pandemic has definitely highlighted the importance of digital skills. With millions of people working remotely during lockdown, cloud computing, video conferencing, online collaboration tools and many other technologies have been crucial.

But as we come out of lockdown and offices reopen, that’s not to say digital skills will no longer be in demand. In fact, with nearly half of employees demanding more flexible working when they return to the workplace, digital skills will continue to be important.

With the rise of remote working and introduction of new technologies in the workplace, I believe there are three clear areas of skill development needed.

The ability to learn how to use new technology, such as new systems, and adapt our ways of working to them. This could be a new bit of software that replaces an Excel spreadsheet, or an RFID scanner that replaces manual checks. Technology is forging its way into our daily working lives, and we shouldn’t underestimate the cultural implications of this in organisations.

The ability to innovate and consider where technology could improve or replace existing products, services and processes. We’ve seen multiple products and industries be disrupted in recent years – for example, online streaming such as Netflix destroying the video rental sector once dominated by Blockbuster. Digital skills aren’t just about coding and building products; they’re fundamentally about thinking digitally, and considering how technology can improve the world we live in.

The development of new products and technology. This is where we get into the area of deep digital skills where engineers and developers sit – actually building solutions on the back of new ideas.

Not everyone in society will need to be able to code, but everyone will need a deeper understanding of how technology is built, and what it’s capable of, so they can help to ensure the evolved products, services and businesses are satisfying, and in some cases, creating consumer demand.

In order to close the digital skills gap and ensure staff are equipped for the future, businesses must help people to develop these skills. But where do you start?
Firstly, be honest and transparent. Digitisation is no longer an optional thing; it’s happening. So, helping to raise awareness and get people to embrace the digital journey has to come first.

Thereafter, it comes down to education. Employers need to start investing both time and money into digital education and skill development, not only as a means to improve their workforce’s skills but as a means to survive.

And I don’t mean that to be taken lightly. It’s been proven multiple times already that those businesses that fail to innovate and to digitise are the ones that, ultimately, fail. So, digital skills development at all levels should be an absolute priority.

Ultimately, while we accelerate further and faster into a fully digital world, I think it’s important that we don’t underestimate the cultural challenges at play here. The very world we’ve been accustomed to is changing, and changing fast.

It’s important that people and businesses get their heads around that, and then start to consider how they, themselves, are going to navigate that transition. And we’re always better when we navigate things together, rather than try to plot a course alone.

Written by Dan Lewis, founder of www.WeStryve.com

Research Links:
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/essential-digital-skills-framework/essential-digital-skills-framework

A flexible future: Brits expected to call time on office life after lockdown

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New Drone Pilot Training Program Builds Skills for the Renewable Energy Industry

The new “Drone Pilot Boot Camp + FAA Part 107 Exam Prep” is a collaboration between three companies: HeatSpring, Little Arms, and Unmanned Experts. They’ve built this unmanned aircract commercial operations course especially for engineering, construction and renewable energy firms.

Keven Gambold is the instructor. Formerly a combat pilot for the British Royal Air Force, Keven has spent the past eight years developing training programs for drone pilots with Unmanned Experts.

Logging flight time is critical for a great course. Little Arms is the software firm behind the top-rated Zephyr drone simulation software. Zephyr works across any platform and has a built-in LMS that allows Keven to review student progress and coach each individual student on their flying. Flying the Zephyr simulations with Keven’s oversight is an incredible way to build skills quickly and efficiently.

Kyle Bishop, CEO at Little Arms says, “We’re proud to announce our new partnership with HeatSpring and Unmanned Experts. The UAS industry is a constantly changing place, establishing effective and standardized training is a great way to help drive the industry forward as a whole.”

HeatSpring brings twelve years of technical online education and a deep understanding of what the market expects from a great course. They’ve spent two years designing this course and finding the right partnerships to make it happen.

“We looked at more than a dozen drone flight simulators and Zephyr was the clear winner for us,” according to Brian Hayden, co-founder at HeatSpring. “It’s built for a training environment and able to work on any machine.”

The course is great for anybody who wants to become a drone pilot, but the primary aim of the course is to unlock new opportunities for engineering, construction, and renewable energy firms. Drones are a powerful and relatively inexpensive way to increase revenue and lower costs on projects big and small.

The next course begins in April 2020 – students who enroll get immediate access to their Zephyr software program. Students who enroll in this session also receive a free FlySky FS-i6S Transmitter.

800-393-2044 Ext. 1

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