economy

economy

Virtual Choir makes desperate plea to Chancellor for parity on support schemes to help rebuild the economy


A powerful 4 minute video of over 100 people singing a parody of, ‘One Day More’ (from Les Miserables) has been released this week by members of ExcludedUK’s Facebook community group.

The arrangement is the work of Kate Cameron and Melody Schroeder, both members of the ExcludedUK community, a non-profit organisation set up to represent the estimated 3 million people who have been excluded from any meaningful financial support from the government throughout the Covid-19 crisis.

Kate, who is a music and singing teacher based in Glasgow, and Melody, an actress and scriptwriter from London, have never met in person, but have been working closely over the summer, putting together the choir, which consists of over 100 other members of the ExcludedUK community, with ages ranging from 18 to 70, some who have never sung publicly before.

Kate worked on the musical arrangement and Melody re-wrote the lyrics to ‘One Day More’, from the hit stage musical, Les Miserables, focusing on the themes of power, dreams and the fighting spirit of the people. The video was brought to life with the help of other ExcludedUK members, David Lawrence (Musical Director), Steve Woods (Video Editor), Tom Smith and Ross Cameron (Sound Engineers),

The arts have been particularly badly hit by the pandemic, with many performers – singers, musicians, dancers, actors, as well as curators, producers and technicians struggling financially after seeing their work literally dry up overnight.

Kate said, “The ExcludedUK community has been a saviour to me and putting this song and video together has given me a focus and a reason to get up in the morning. It’s been an amazing experience.”

Melody agrees with Kate, “I was really struggling with my mental health too, and I am so grateful that I met Kate through the Facebook group and I’m so inspired by all the amazing people in the ExcludedUK choir and proud of what we have created.”

It is hoped that this video and message in the song will further highlight the plight of the 3 million UK taxpayers who have been excluded from government support during the coronavirus crisis.

For more info:
maria@excludeduk.org / press@excludeduk.org
www.excludeduk.org
www.kcchoir.co.uk
www.melodyschroeder.com
www.insidestoryuk.com

Notes to Editors:
ExcludedUK is a volunteer-run grassroots non-profit organisation committed to working towards bringing an end to the exclusions in the Government’s Covid-19 financial support measures affecting 3 million individuals and businesses excluded through no fault of their own.
www.excludeduk.org

About ExcludedUK:

ExcludedUK is a newly formed non-profit NGO and serves as a collective platform for those entirely or largely excluded from the UK Government’s Covid-19 financial support measures. We are a rapidly growing organisation and an inclusive community, representing a broad spectrum of individuals and businesses, but all sharing one common thread: we are excluded.

As an organisation we will play a crucial role in facilitating support and assistance on multiple levels, both for now and into the future.Our aim is to build a stronger platform, raise awareness, lobby for support, raise funds for legal challenges and help enable the changes that are needed for those excluded. Most importantly, our hope is that our efforts can help propel affected individuals and businesses forward in the face of adversity resulting from Covid-19 and being excluded from Government support, while equally ensuring we are all able to help each other emerge from this crisis.

EXCLUDEDUK
an inclusive alliance for the excluded:
creating a collective platform for those excluded from UK government Covid-19 support
www.excludeduk.org

Anneka Hicks
Founder
ExcludedUK

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The United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement Removes “Margin Killers” in the Post COVID-19 Economy


The USMCA will support mutually beneficial trade leading to freer markets, fairer trade, and robust economic growth in North America. It will also brings lucrative opportunities to boost cross-border e-commerce.

WASHINGTON– Mexico and Canada are the top two export destinations for U.S. Small and Medium-Enterprises goods. In 2016 (latest data available), 82,000 U.S. small and medium sized businesses exported $51.2 billion in goods to Canada, and 53,000 U.S. small and medium businesses exported $76.2 billion in goods to Mexico.

Now, for the first time in a U.S. trade agreement, the USMCA includes a dedicated chapter on SMEs, as well as other key provisions supporting small and medium-sized businesses throughout the agreement.

In recognition that digital trade represents enormous value to the U.S. economy and plays a critical role in fostering economic growth and innovation, the USMCA includes a first-of-its-kind chapter on digital trade that contains the strongest commitments of any international agreement.

Entrepreneurs on both sides of the Mexican border are working with their State Government agencies to level up their digital efforts for exportation and distribution without having to rely on a supply chain organized by brokers that exhaust profit margins. These “margin killers” are facing extinction as entrepreneurs are understanding the opportunities being afforded to them under USMCA.

“In today’s market conditions, we have to work to create win-win opportunities for all. The brokers that have historically taken advantage of exporters, and inflated market prices, will have a hard time doing so in the post COVID-19 economy under the new United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement. The United States Business Association of E-Commerce will work to support mutually beneficial trade leading to freer markets, fairer trade, and robust economic growth in North America” said Tayde Aburto, CEO of the USBAEC.

Businesses interested in promoting their products and services online and leveraging the benefits of the USMCA can join the Exporters/Importers marketplace https://usbaec.com/marketplaces/exim.

About the United States Business Association of E-Commerce:

The United States Business Association of E-Commerce is an online business association connecting small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) with domestic and global buyers and leveraging an online platform to help businesses compete more effectively in the digital economy.

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Brits’ Biggest Fear About Coronavirus is Economy


The number one fear British people have about the coronavirus is what it will do to the economy, according to new data.

Consumer research platform Attest ran a nationally representative survey of 1,000 UK consumers to find out just how worried the nation is and what we’re worried about [see full data here: https://dashboard.askattest.com/survey/AE5U2WNBUV6VXW

Overall, 63% of people are feeling more anxious now than they were before the outbreak of COVID-19, and 17% say their anxiety levels are “much higher”.

What are they worried about?

Just over 70% of Brits are worried about the effect coronavirus will have on the economy, with 30% describing themselves as “very worried”.

Behind this, the second biggest concern for people is their parents or grandparents catching the virus (68%), with 39% “very worried” by the prospect.

Nearly 61% of Brits are worried about contracting the coronavirus themselves, while a lesser 56% are worrying about their kids or grandkids getting the virus. Of greater concern is the potential for the outbreak to interrupt travel or social plans – nearly 58% of people are worried about this.

Of least concern are workplace closures and school closures; half of people (50%) are worried about not being able to go to work and only 39% are worried about children not being able to attend school.

Here are some of the concerns people expressed:

“I’m anxious over the economy and FTSE crashing, hitting pension funds”

“I care for my dad so I am very worried all the time.”

“I’m staying at home as I have underlying health issues with my lungs.”

“It has increased my anxiety about meeting people.”

How bad will it get?

We asked people what they think is going to happen with the coronavirus outbreak, and the outlook of the British people is not optimistic. Nearly half of people think “we’ve not seen the worst of it yet”, while a further 33% believe we’re “headed for a full-blown global pandemic”. Only 18% of people think “it will all be over soon”.

There is a direct correlation between how much news about coronavirus a person consumes and how worried they feel. People who see or hear updates hourly are five times more likely to be experiencing high levels of anxiety than people who only receive updates once every couple of days.

What impact are fears having?

British people are most likely to be avoiding public transport, stations and airports in an effort to avoid contracting the coronavirus (27%). Public attractions are also considered high-risk areas, with 26% of people actively avoiding them.

Around a fifth of people are avoiding the cinema, theatres and concerts, as well as restaurants, pubs and nightclubs. Least likely to be considered risky are church services, social groups and clubs (11%) and the gym (15%).

Panic buying is yet to become a big problem; only 19% of Brits say they have started stockpiling. But people are taking precautions; 81% have started washing or sanitising their hands more often.

Only 10% of people have made changes to their travel plans, but 11% are considering making changes and 21% are waiting to make travel plans because of the uncertainty.

To see the full survey on the Attest platform, including responses to additional questions, visit https://dashboard.askattest.com/survey/AE5U2WNBUV6VXW

For more information about Attest visit https://www.askattest.com/. For press enquiries please contact: bel.booker@askattest.com

About Attest

We believe great companies put consumers and data at the heart of every decision. They create better, more useful products and services, which leads to happier consumers and ever-greater success.

That’s why Attest is on a mission to bring every business closer to consumers and empower them with the insights that drive predictable and repeatable growth.

How? We call it a Consumer Growth Platform, where everyone can get answers to their burning questions from audiences of 100 million consumers across 80 markets.

Our clients use Attest to learn more about their target consumers, enter new markets, build new categories, validate decisions, develop better products and services, measure their brand, track competition, all with the goal of building new, predictable, and repeatable growth.

Clients include Heineken, Walgreens Boots, Samsung, Fever-Tree, Discovery and Transferwise, Nutmeg, among many others.

For additional information, visit www.askattest.com.

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Data shows post-Brexit immigration plans will hurt UK gig economy


Data shows post-Brexit immigration plans will hurt UK gig economy
The Government’s post-Brexit immigration plans are aimed at reducing the number of low skilled workers entering the country.
Along with the farming, catering, nursing and care sectors, it is highly likely that workers in the gig economy will be excluded
from the skilled category.

The proposals are likely to intensify the fall in immigrants coming to the UK to work. According to figures published by the Office
for National Statistics, EU net migration is now less than half the level it was at its peak and more workers from Eastern European
countries are leaving than arriving. This trend is already impacting the UK gig economy.

Ana Andres, co-founder of TidyChoice, a platform for independent cleaners analysed the source of their applications over the
past five years. TidyChoice receives over 10,000 applications annually and is a good proxy for the overall London gig economy.
“The rate of applications from Eastern European nationalities has diminished drastically since the Brexit referendum. Better job
prospects at home, weaker Sterling and Brexit uncertainty are the main reasons for the fall. We have maintained strong growth
in total applications by plugging the gap with ever increasing applications from other countries.

Currently only 40% of our applications come from UK nationals. Without overseas workers, it will be very difficult for us to achieve
our targeted 30-40% annual increase in applications that we need to support business growth and counter natural attrition.

The Government is calling on companies to “adapt and adjust”. We cannot automate in our sector and the pool of UK citizens
seeking cleaning work will quickly dry up. I am worried that without new workers coming to the UK, the sector will shrink and
consumer prices will inevitably increase.”

About TidyChoice
Founded in 2014, by Colin Weston and Ana Andres del Valle, TidyChoice is an online platform, offering home cleaning and
childcare services for London residents. TidyChoice professionals undergo a careful vetting process, to ensure customers can
choose from a trusted and reliable community of housekeepers. Customers can choose their preferred professional and
professionals can choose their own rate, hours and areas of work.

Media Contact Details

Colin Weston, TidyChoice

London, United Kingdom

02081331830

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