education

education

Grok Global Expands Education Services with New Subsidiary in South Asia

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Grok Global Services announced it has established a new subsidiary in India, adding to its existing global footprint in China, Malaysia and Vietnam. With initial offices in New Delhi and Chennai, this expansion augments Grok’s global recruitment management and marketing capabilities, and expands Grok’s ability to provide a unified and feature-rich framework for staff deployment across Asia.

Since 2013, Grok has served its clients in India via its India-based partner, Sannam S4. “Since forming this very successful partnership, both Grok and Sannam have expanded. With growing geographic scope and new global service offerings, we are excited that Grok is able to serve clients more fully with its own presence in South Asia. However, Sannam S4 has been, and will continue to be, a key partner for Grok and Grok clients for services in such areas as research and academic collaborations, tax and structural advice, etc.. We look forward to the next stage of our partnership together”, says Kim Morrison, CEO of Grok Global Services.

Grok India will be led by Dylan Hoemsen, who recently joined the organization as Executive Director, South Asia. “I am thrilled to join the great team at Grok and to be able to further build out our solutions offered in South Asia. As a leader in the industry, Grok is showing their commitment to their services and their clients with the expanded presence in South Asia.” says Hoemsen. A familiar face in the region, Hoemsen has spent the last five years living in India where he led the regional recruitment team for Navitas’ North American portfolio.

Grok is pleased to further announce that they will be adding the India-based team of University of Newcastle, Australia to the Grok community. “We’re thrilled to be Grok’s first client institution in India, this is an important market for the University, and we heavily rely on our offshore teams, hosted by Grok, to help us achieve our international goals,” said Hung Truong, Head of International Student Recruitment at Newcastle. “We’ve worked successfully with Grok across multiple geographies for a number of years, deploying representatives in Grok’s China, Malaysia and Vietnam offices. Having the ability to extend this service to India means we are now getting consistent standards of operational support across Asia, and we can work seamlessly to expand our in-country presence across Asia.”

About Grok Global Services
Grok is a professional services firm providing in-country staff, infrastructure and expertise to help education institutions succeed in international markets. Since 2005, Grok has worked with more than 150 clients to extend their reach and improve their outcomes in international engagement and recruitment. Grok’s clients range from globally ranked, large universities to small colleges, schools, and government bodies. Grok serves clients from a range of destinations such as the US, UK, Canada, Australia, Ireland and New Zealand, and the experience serving so many diverse clients in locations across Asia gives Grok an unprecedented view into the dynamics and best practices in its delivery markets.

For more information on Grok and the expanded services offered in South Asia, please contact:
Dylan Hoemsen, Grok Global Services
Delhi, India
+91 84489 38258
dylan.hoemsen@grokglobal.com

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Tuition Company to help fund education for vulnerable children in Brazil

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Maidstone based tuition company to fund education for children in Brazil.

Changing lives one lesson at a time.

Vulnerable children often not accessing school in Brazil are to receive additional support with life changing education and mentoring thanks to a new scheme run by Maidstone company Outreach Tuition.   Outreach Tuition support vulnerable children and disadvantaged young people within Kent and South London. For every new pupil referred to them by primary and secondary schools, local authorities and alternative settings, Outreach Tuition will in turn, fund the education of a child in Brazil.

Outreach Tuition, run by Jodie Devlin, is to help support education through the charity Meninadanca.  Meninadanca works with around 300 children and young people every day, in some of the poorest communities along Brazil’s main highway where they are often exploited by their families. The charity’s Pink Houses provide a safe haven where they can learn to flourish through a mix of programmes to help empower and educate themselves. Through a mix of dance, art and education, the charity helps them to overcome their past, erase fear and build a meaningful future. Meninadance also works with families within these vulnerable areas to educate them on the value of their children within the community.

Jodie Devlin, Director of Outreach Tuition says “School leaders in London and the South East can really feel as though they are making a difference now when they refer pupils to us. In addition to receiving our life changing home tuition for the vulnerable pupils in their own schools, they equally will be lifting up a deprived area of Brazil. We are starting with this scheme in Brazil, but it is our vision to eventually support the education of vulnerable children all over the world.

it organisation that works with at-risk girls in communities

Outreach Tuition currently supports vulnerable and disadvantaged children in Kent and South London. The team work with schools and councils in the south-east offering a tailored and cost effective approach to support vulnerable children. Outreach Tuition were finalists at both the Maidstone Business Awards and Kent Women in Business.

Jodie is planning on visiting the Pink Houses in Brazil in 2021.

High res images are available on request.

More information www.outreachtuition.com.

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NUTRITION EDUCATION IS A GREAT ABSENTEE IN THE CURRICULUM OF EUROPEAN DOCTORS

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ESPEN LAUNCHES THE EUROPEAN MANIFESTO TO FILL THE TRAINING GAP

Nice, January 22 2020 – “During the medical training at the University the students should receive mandatory information about human nutrition in its three different domains, including basic nutrition, applied or public health nutrition and clinical nutrition”, as indicated in the “Manifesto for the Implementation of Nutrition Education” just released in Nice during the ESPEN-NEMS meeting.

“The way to organise these themes in the curriculum, also including novel teaching tools, internet resources and e-learning, will depend on each University centre, taking into consideration the different possible models of teaching (parallel, integrated or case-solving based), the availability of teachers and the distribution of time and credits with the rest of teaching subjects” the Manifesto says.

Although the teaching of nutrition is an essential element of medical training, a recent survey (1) has shown that there is an extreme variability in the educational standards of this subject in medical schools worldwide. As a consequence, there are differences in the access and quality of treatments received by patients.

Worldwide, more than 2 billion adults are overweight, 600 million obese and 462 million malnourished. These conditions contribute to 60% of cardiovascular death and 35% of tumor death. Even less known is that 35% of hospitalised patients develop disease-related malnutrition, a real ‘disease in a disease’.

“Weight loss in chronic, oncological, elderly and frail patients is an underestimated and under-diagnosed problem” Professor Rocco Barazzoni, ESPEN Chairman, explains. “Loss of weight and muscle mass leads to a higher rate of complications, worse response to therapies, higher mortality and increase in healthcare expenditures. This occurs in spite of the well documented positive and cost-effective impact of nutritional therapy on treatment side effects and disease outcomes.

“Implementing training is urgent” echoes Professor Maurizio Muscaritoli, Coordinator of the NEMS initiative together with the Spanish Professor Cristina Cuerda. “Learning nutrition is mandatory for future doctors. Seeking political support, forming ad hoc committees for the development of curricula and teaching modalities are among the key factors to allow for the implementation of nutrition training in universities”.

“Nutrition education in undergraduate medical schools is heterogeneous and largely under-powered” Professor Cuerda says, and adds: “teachers and students believe that the time dedicated to nutrition teaching is insufficient and far from what would be needed”.

The recently published ESPEN position paper (2) has identified the “minimum curriculum knowledge” in nutrition that serves to improve the training of the future doctors. This has been transferred into the Manifesto which was issued and signed by the 51 participants, including delegates of 13 European Medical Schools, representing 34 countries.

1. Cuerda et al – A clinical nutrition education in medical schools: results of an ESPEN survey – Clin Nutr (2017);36:915-6
2. Cuerda et al – Nutrition education in medical schools (NEMS). An ESPEN position paper – Clinical Nutrition (2019); 38: 969-974

ESPEN (European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism) is an organization dedicated to all issues relevant to the field of clinical nutrition and metabolism and promotes: basic and clinical research, basic and advanced education and organization of consensus statements about clinical care and care quality control.
NEMS is an initiative of the ESPEN Nutrition Education Study Group (NESG)

Press Office NEMS Manifesto
Mrs. Johanna Rossi Mason
Mason&Partners
Mobile 0039-347-2626993
jrossimason@gmail.com
Rome – Italy

NUTRITION EDUCATION IN MEDICAL SCHOOLS (NEMS) INITIATIVE

Manifesto for the Implementation of Nutrition Education
in the Undergraduate Medical Currriculum

The NEMS Manifesto

Nutrition is a broad, interdisciplinary field, encompassing a large variety of scientific, cultural, social and political aspects. Human Nutrition is identified by three major domains, namely Basic, Applied and Clinical Nutrition. Human nutrition is an intrinsically complex topic, ranging from agriculture and zootechnics to food technology, from nutrition in different physiological states (growth, pregnancy, breast-feeding, aging), to the nutritional approach to acute and chronic diseases, from birth to the end of life.

At present, and due to its innate complexity, the nutritional field is often dominated by confusion: researchers, clinicians, patients and media have inconsistent ideas related to nutritional issues in health and disease. The complexity of the matter and the apparent confusion, however, should not represent an obstacle in acknowledging the relevance of nutrition in both preventive and clinical medicine.

The prevalence of obesity and related complications and the mortality rates due to NCDs such as cardiovascular diseases, cancer, diabetes or COPD are steadily increasing and cause > 60% of diseases burden. Conversely, the rates of disease-related malnutrition (under-nutrition) have remained substantially unchanged since the 1970s. Malnutrition still causes high rates of complications, mortality and healthcare costs and about 12% or more of hospital expenditure.

While research has clearly documented that nutrition can positively impact on disease onset, prognosis, treatment side effects and outcomes, there is a great neglect regarding the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of malnutrition (including over- and under-nutrition) and low priority is currently given to nutritional activities by other disciplines in the competition for healthcare budget.

The training of healthcare professionals (HCPs), and in particular of medical doctors, becomes crucial both for a correct take-up of the problem and for effectively combating the confounding environment that prevails in the domains of Human Nutrition. Currently, (Clinical) Nutrition education in undergraduate Medical Schools is heterogeneous and largely underpowered.

Medical students are trained to consider the scientific evidence for pharmaceutical decision-making and clinical guidelines promoted by scientific institutions in specialties such as cardiology or surgery, while the evidence for nutritional interventions and the guidelines in Clinical Nutrition are often underevaluated.

ESPEN
NUTRITION EDUCATION IN MEDICAL SCHOOLS (NEMS) INITIATIVE*
Manifesto for the Implementation of Nutrition Education
in the Undergraduate Medical Currriculum
The NEMS Manifesto

Based on the previous arguments, we manifest that:

• Nutrition education is necessary in the training of healthcare professionals, including medical students and should be mandatory in all Medical Schools

• Medical students need an evidence-based nutrition education to understand the importance of nutrition in health and disease

• During the medical training at the University the students should receive mandatory information about human nutrition in its three different domains, including basic nutrition, applied or public health nutrition and clinical nutrition

• The way to organise these themes in the curriculum (i.e. vertical or horizontal integration of traditional classes, seminars and/or clinical practice sessions), also including novel teaching tools, internet resources and e-learning, will depend on each University centre, taking into consideration the different possible models of teaching (parallel, integrated or case-solving based), the availability of teachers and the distribution of time and credits with the rest of teaching subjects.

https://www.prfire.com/https://www.prfire.com/

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NUTRITION EDUCATION IS A GREAT ABSENTEE IN THE CURRICULUM OF EUROPEAN DOCTORS

[ad_1]

ESPEN LAUNCHES THE EUROPEAN MANIFESTO TO FILL THE TRAINING GAP

Nice, January 22 2020 – “During the medical training at the University the students should receive mandatory information about human nutrition in its three different domains, including basic nutrition, applied or public health nutrition and clinical nutrition”, as indicated in the “Manifesto for the Implementation of Nutrition Education” just released in Nice during the ESPEN-NEMS meeting.

“The way to organise these themes in the curriculum, also including novel teaching tools, internet resources and e-learning, will depend on each University centre, taking into consideration the different possible models of teaching (parallel, integrated or case-solving based), the availability of teachers and the distribution of time and credits with the rest of teaching subjects” the Manifesto says.

Although the teaching of nutrition is an essential element of medical training, a recent survey (1) has shown that there is an extreme variability in the educational standards of this subject in medical schools worldwide. As a consequence, there are differences in the access and quality of treatments received by patients.

Worldwide, more than 2 billion adults are overweight, 600 million obese and 462 million malnourished. These conditions contribute to 60% of cardiovascular death and 35% of tumor death. Even less known is that 35% of hospitalised patients develop disease-related malnutrition, a real ‘disease in a disease’.

“Weight loss in chronic, oncological, elderly and frail patients is an underestimated and under-diagnosed problem” Professor Rocco Barazzoni, ESPEN Chairman, explains. “Loss of weight and muscle mass leads to a higher rate of complications, worse response to therapies, higher mortality and increase in healthcare expenditures. This occurs in spite of the well documented positive and cost-effective impact of nutritional therapy on treatment side effects and disease outcomes.

“Implementing training is urgent” echoes Professor Maurizio Muscaritoli, Coordinator of the NEMS initiative together with the Spanish Professor Cristina Cuerda. “Learning nutrition is mandatory for future doctors. Seeking political support, forming ad hoc committees for the development of curricula and teaching modalities are among the key factors to allow for the implementation of nutrition training in universities”.

“Nutrition education in undergraduate medical schools is heterogeneous and largely under-powered” Professor Cuerda says, and adds: “teachers and students believe that the time dedicated to nutrition teaching is insufficient and far from what would be needed”.

The recently published ESPEN position paper (2) has identified the “minimum curriculum knowledge” in nutrition that serves to improve the training of the future doctors. This has been transferred into the Manifesto which was issued and signed by the 51 participants, including delegates of 13 European Medical Schools, representing 34 countries.

1. Cuerda et al – A clinical nutrition education in medical schools: results of an ESPEN survey – Clin Nutr (2017);36:915-6
2. Cuerda et al – Nutrition education in medical schools (NEMS). An ESPEN position paper – Clinical Nutrition (2019); 38: 969-974

ESPEN (European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism) is an organization dedicated to all issues relevant to the field of clinical nutrition and metabolism and promotes: basic and clinical research, basic and advanced education and organization of consensus statements about clinical care and care quality control.
NEMS is an initiative of the ESPEN Nutrition Education Study Group (NESG)

Press Office NEMS Manifesto
Mrs. Johanna Rossi Mason
Mason&Partners
Mobile 0039-347-2626993
jrossimason@gmail.com
Rome – Italy

NUTRITION EDUCATION IN MEDICAL SCHOOLS (NEMS) INITIATIVE

Manifesto for the Implementation of Nutrition Education
in the Undergraduate Medical Currriculum

The NEMS Manifesto

Nutrition is a broad, interdisciplinary field, encompassing a large variety of scientific, cultural, social and political aspects. Human Nutrition is identified by three major domains, namely Basic, Applied and Clinical Nutrition. Human nutrition is an intrinsically complex topic, ranging from agriculture and zootechnics to food technology, from nutrition in different physiological states (growth, pregnancy, breast-feeding, aging), to the nutritional approach to acute and chronic diseases, from birth to the end of life.

At present, and due to its innate complexity, the nutritional field is often dominated by confusion: researchers, clinicians, patients and media have inconsistent ideas related to nutritional issues in health and disease. The complexity of the matter and the apparent confusion, however, should not represent an obstacle in acknowledging the relevance of nutrition in both preventive and clinical medicine.

The prevalence of obesity and related complications and the mortality rates due to NCDs such as cardiovascular diseases, cancer, diabetes or COPD are steadily increasing and cause > 60% of diseases burden. Conversely, the rates of disease-related malnutrition (under-nutrition) have remained substantially unchanged since the 1970s. Malnutrition still causes high rates of complications, mortality and healthcare costs and about 12% or more of hospital expenditure.

While research has clearly documented that nutrition can positively impact on disease onset, prognosis, treatment side effects and outcomes, there is a great neglect regarding the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of malnutrition (including over- and under-nutrition) and low priority is currently given to nutritional activities by other disciplines in the competition for healthcare budget.

The training of healthcare professionals (HCPs), and in particular of medical doctors, becomes crucial both for a correct take-up of the problem and for effectively combating the confounding environment that prevails in the domains of Human Nutrition. Currently, (Clinical) Nutrition education in undergraduate Medical Schools is heterogeneous and largely underpowered.

Medical students are trained to consider the scientific evidence for pharmaceutical decision-making and clinical guidelines promoted by scientific institutions in specialties such as cardiology or surgery, while the evidence for nutritional interventions and the guidelines in Clinical Nutrition are often underevaluated.

ESPEN
NUTRITION EDUCATION IN MEDICAL SCHOOLS (NEMS) INITIATIVE*
Manifesto for the Implementation of Nutrition Education
in the Undergraduate Medical Currriculum
The NEMS Manifesto

Based on the previous arguments, we manifest that:

• Nutrition education is necessary in the training of healthcare professionals, including medical students and should be mandatory in all Medical Schools

• Medical students need an evidence-based nutrition education to understand the importance of nutrition in health and disease

• During the medical training at the University the students should receive mandatory information about human nutrition in its three different domains, including basic nutrition, applied or public health nutrition and clinical nutrition

• The way to organise these themes in the curriculum (i.e. vertical or horizontal integration of traditional classes, seminars and/or clinical practice sessions), also including novel teaching tools, internet resources and e-learning, will depend on each University centre, taking into consideration the different possible models of teaching (parallel, integrated or case-solving based), the availability of teachers and the distribution of time and credits with the rest of teaching subjects.

https://www.prfire.com/https://www.prfire.com/

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PosecAfrica Launches African Continental on Building Sustainable Wealth

Denis is a young builder in Cameroon who has opened a new office and increased revenues by almost 35%. Esther is a roadside vendor in Nigeria who is adept at saving and reinvesting into her business by making little adjustments on what she spends on. Philemon runs a small production plant where he makes various flavors of popcorn. He has succeeded to expand his production plant’.

What all these hustlers have in common is, they found suitable investment opportunities and raised as little as $1,000 to expand their businesses through collaboration with PosecAfrica. At the back of their successes is PosecAfrica (Political, Social, and Economic Change Through Entrepreneurship in Africa), a 2-year-old platform Gerald Chiatoh Etangayong founded in November of 2017.

PosecAfrica Continental Tour:

Now, Gerald has launched the PosecAfrica Continental Tour to help entrepreneurs build sustainable wealth with through their businesses. The tour which will start in Yaounde, Cameroon, from November 2019, will run under the theme: “Building Sustainable Wealth ‘Money’ How to Make it and Keep It.”

Commenting on the tour, Gerald Chiatoh said:
“This topic has been the one topic that resonates with all our platform members from the moment we began. We believe in teaching people how to build sustainable wealth and by this, we are doing Africa three favors:

1) Helping to create entrepreneurs who will usher in economic prosperity.

2) Empowering people who will create jobs to solve the massive unemployment we face in Africa today.

3) We also believe that the collective impact of these empowered entrepreneurs will bring in the needed economic reforms and even force politicians to make economic and social-friendly policies.”

Besides building sustainable wealth, having the right mindset is uber important for succeeding in business and in life.

As an entrepreneur and founder of PosecAfrica, Gerald Chiatoh understands the struggles of entrepreneurship in Africa and across Europe.
“We create change, starting with the mindset. Our work centers around creating political, social and economic change, not through politics or engaging in policy formulation, but by creating and empowering entrepreneurs. We believe creating millions of entrepreneurs across Africa will usher in an era of prosperity and the need for better economic policies, will bring about needed reforms in the political and social milieu. The impact we create through our network and community of entrepreneurs cannot be overlooked. Society depends on the creativity and bravery of these entrepreneurs to create opportunities for themselves and their communities,” he said.

Living the PosecAfrica dream

Believing that Africans have the power to shape their destinies according to their imagination, Gerald and his team at Posec Africa are out to reset the mindset of Africans.
“My motivation comes from making people believe they can have what they want. Do what they want. Create the change they desire and make the world better.
Changing the mindset of African youths and preventing them from falling into online scams, is, therefore, the sole goal of this vibrant entrepreneur. He aims to create and empower entrepreneurs who will change Africa’s landscape.
“I am excited about the opportunities I see around Africa. That creates a passion in me to make sure that others see it too and take full advantage of it. It was for this reason that we created Posec Africa in 2017 to enable young Africans to maximize their opportunities.

“There are over 600 million youths across Africa. Our goal is to transform one million of them into successful entrepreneurs by 2025. So far, we have almost 14,4000 entrepreneurs and aspiring entrepreneurs in our network. My goal is to see Africa transformed to become the economic bedrock of the world. Leading in all aspects. To see that goal achieved, I believe entrepreneurship is a fundamental part and milestone to enable it happen.”

Meet Gerald Chiatoh Etangayong

Gerald Chiatoh Etangayong grew up in Cameroon. He holds a B.sc in Political Science and Administration from the University of Buea, Cameroon. He also has Masters in Business Administration with a specialty in International Business.

Growing up, Gerald’s parents made him to believe that the more degrees he had, the higher his value in the job market would be. However, when he started his business, he realized, true value comes from what one can give (talents, work ethics, beliefs, and knowledge).
“I realized that the best education we get is the one we map out for ourselves, not the curricula laid out by pedagogy.”
With that notion, Gerald found his way to the United Kingdom, and that was where he got his vision.
I came to the UK with one goal, learn how to make money to empower others and use my success experiences to teach others to do the same. So far, I believe the plan is working

The power of persistence

A successful social entrepreneur who coaches and mentors, Gerald remains relentless in his fight for a better Africa.
“The first lesson anyone doing anything needs to learn is, believe you can and you will. Nothing has or will ever be achieved if the one bearing the dream or vision doesn’t believe he/she can succeed. After believing, comes action and persistence until success comes. Sometimes, people give up too quickly and easily. Persistence means sticking to it till it’s done, and that’s how you win or get anything done. Strategy is only 2%, execution is 3%, mindset, faith, and persistence make up 95% of success.”

A positive mindset is what Gerald believes can create millions of entrepreneurs across Africa and usher in an era of prosperity.
He’s, therefore, calling on Africans to think positively as limited thinking leads to limited ideas, which stunt growth and performance.

Instagram: @Pose_africa.
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/posecafrica/

Original source PRFire.com

Schools to switch to online forms from paper forms saving thousands

Stephen Clarke, Director of MagedMaged, an Education Technology company aims to save schools thousands by reducing their reliance on paper forms by offering a service to take their paper forms and turn them into secure online forms to send to parents.

Stephen Clarke, Director of MagedTens of millions of parents sign hundreds of millions of paper forms every year around the world on behalf of their children. In the UK alone, it is estimated that around 900 million paper forms are sent by the over 30000 Schools each year. Schools send around 30 paper forms per student per year, in a school with a thousand pupils that’s 30000 paper forms per year per school.

Sending paper forms is labour intensive, costly and unreliable. Schools print and photocopy tens of thousands of forms every day, this is a big cost to the environment and the school budget. It is also unreliable, students put them in their bags and parents may or may not eventually get them.

Maged, with over 40 years’ experience in Education, Finance and Technology consciously help to save schools thousands every year at a time when most UK schools face significant challenges to their budgets.

Offering schools a service to help them move paper forms online is a great way to help schools make savings whilst reducing down their administrative burden. Once the paper form is converted to an online form, a link to that is sent to parents by the school via their App, website, SMS text message, letter or email.

Parents click on that link and complete the form, the results of every form completed are sent to any school email address.

Stephen Clarke, Director of Maged “As a parent, I get lots of paper letters and forms from our school, which must be very costly for them at a time when budgets are tough. We are all used to completing forms online and signing for things electronically. Maged aims to help schools move to the same offering whilst saving them time and money.”

Further details on how schools can switch to sending online forms rather than paper forms can be found at www.maged.cc

Notes to Editors: To arrange an interview or photo please email hello@maged.cc