Successful fly tipping prosecution across the city

Hull City Council warns residents to ensure they dispose of waste legally or face enforcement action, following a string of prosecutions for fly tipping.

The council always recommends that residents dispose of or recycle waste properly through legitimate services. Fly tipping is defined as the ‘illegal deposit of any waste onto land that does not have a licence to accept it’.

If waste is fly tipped, the responsible party will be issued a fixed penalty notice of £400. If the penalty notice is not paid, attempts to communicate are ignored or the council has to remove waste, the case is passed on to the council’s legal team for prosecution. 

Mark Cornall, Waste Enforcement Team Leader, said: “Fly tipping is a crime and we will not tolerate it in Hull. It’s unsightly, harmful to health and the environment and makes our communities look neglected.

“We urge residents to dispose of their waste in the correct way and to report those who don’t. We want the people of Hull to know that we take fly tipping very seriously and respond to reports of it quickly and efficiently.

“I want to thank all the Streetscene staff who work tirelessly to clear fly-tipped rubbish and to pursue those who break the law in this way. Our staff do an excellent job in keeping Hull’s streets and communal areas clean; but we need everyone to play their part in keeping them that way.” 

Services and schemes the council provide to dispose of waste:

  • For large items residents can use the bulky household collection scheme. Households are eligible for one free collection per year of up to five items which can include cookers, dishwashers, fridges, mattresses, sofas etc.  
  • There are three household waste and recycling centres located across the city, open every day from 10am – 5pm, which residents can use free of charge. All are modern facilities, designed to maintain and improve recycling within the city.
  • White electrical goods in working order can be donated and / or collected free of charge to be sold at a discounted price in the Reuse Electrical Shop – a joint initiative with Dove House Hospice, ERYC and FCC Environment that aims to keep white goods in use for as long as possible.

Details of 15 successful prosecution cases up until December 2021 are as follows:

  • Miss Toni Elizabeth Walker (aged 47 years) of Barnsley Street, Hull attended Hull Magistrates’ Court on 26 November 2021 and pleaded guilty to an offence contrary to section 34(2A) Environmental Protection Act 1990 – receiving fines and costs of £535. This case was brought forward by the council in response to evidence obtained in January 2021. An officer from the environmental enforcement team conducted investigations, which resulted in a fixed penalty notice for fly tipping.

    As Miss Walker failed to pay the fixed penalty issued, ignored further correspondence and the wastes were cleared and disposed of by the council – the case was referred to the council’s legal team for prosecution.

  • Ms Cristina-Maria Curt and Mr Marius Boboc (both aged 25 years) both of Cottingham Road, Hull attended Hull Magistrates’ Court on 3 December 2021 and pleaded guilty to offences contrary to section 2(1)(b) Refuse Disposal (Amenity) Act 1978. Each received fines and costs of £300.00 – totalling £600.00.

    CCTV footage was obtained of the pair from a mobile camera on Haworth Street, Hull in August 2020 – installed by the council following an increase of fly tipping. After additional evidence was gathered and the successful identification of those involved, both were issued with a fixed penalty notice for fly tipping.

    As Ms Curt and Mr Boboc failed to pay the fixed penalty issued, ignored further correspondence and the waste was cleared and disposed of by the council – the case was referred to the council’s legal team for prosecution.

  • Miss Claire Cooper (aged 43 years) of Wadham Grove, Hull attended Hull Magistrates’ Court on 26 November 2021 and pleaded guilty to an offence contrary to section 34(2A) Environmental Protection Act 1990 – receiving fines and costs of £530.

    Evidence was obtained in June 2020, which showed waste fly tipped on the drain bank near Exeter Grove, Hull. Miss Cooper was issued with a fixed penalty notice.

    As Miss Cooper failed pay the fixed penalty issued, further correspondence and the waste was cleared and disposed of lawfully by the council – the case was referred to the council’s legal team for prosecution.

  • Mr Aminul Choudhury (aged 47 years) of Myrtle Villas, Hull pleaded guilty to offences committed contrary to section 34 and section 80 of the Environmental Protection Act 1990. Hull Magistrates’ Court imposed fines and costs of a total of £2,231 for the offences committed.

    The offence, under section 34 Environmental Protection Act 1990, had been brought by the Council in response to evidence obtained by the Council regarding waste found unlawfully deposited on Myrtle Villas, Spring Bank, Hull in April of 2020.

  • Miss Ancuta Baiaram (aged 29 years) of Beverley Road, Hull attended Hull Magistrates’ Court in September 2021 and pleaded guilty to an offence contrary to section 2(1)(b) Refuse Disposal (Amenity) Act 1978 – resulting in fines and costs of £684.

    This case was brought by the council in response to CCTV evidence provided by a member of the public, which showed Miss Baiaram depositing wastes on Suffolk Street, Hull in August 2020.  

  • Miss Zana Paulauskaite (aged 24 years) of Elloughton Grove, Hull failed to attend Hull Magistrates’ Court in October 2021 and was convicted in her absence of an offence contrary to section 2(1)(b) Refuse Disposal (Amenity) Act 1978 – resulting in fines and costs of £580.

    A fixed penalty was issued following evidence found by the council’s fly-tipping clearance team when removing fly tipped waste from Elloughton Grove in April 2021.

    Miss Paulauskaite failed to pay the fixed penalty issued, ignored further correspondence and the waste was cleared and disposed of by the council – this case was referred to the council’s legal team for prosecution.

  • Miss Lucy King (aged 23 years) of Laburnum Grove, Hull attended Hull Magistrates’ Court on 30 August 2021 and pleaded guilty to an offence contrary to section 34(2A) Environmental Protection Act 1990 – resulting in fines of £750.

    A fixed penalty notice was issued in response to evidence of waste found fly tipped on the public highway on Laburnum Grove near Lorraine Street, Hull.

    As Miss King failed to pay the fixed penalty the case was referred to the council’s legal team for prosecution.

  • M3A Property Investments Limited, of Greenwich View Place London, failed to attend Hull Magistrates’ Court on the 15th October 2021 and in their absence were sentenced to total fines and costs of £1,395.

    Under the Environmental Protection Act 1990, they caused a statutory nuisance to neighbours by failing to deal with the condition of household property.

    Hull City Council’s Environmental Enforcement Officers responded to complaints about the condition of the property on Mayfield Avenue, Hull in May including odours and appearance, along with allegations of rats which were attracted to waste accumulated on the land.

    Investigations revealed the property was not regularly cleaned or maintained by M3A Property Investments Limited, resulting in foul smells and flies which affected neighbours and others within the vicinity.

    M3A Property Investments Limited were served a legal notice in accordance with sections 79 and 80 Environmental Protection Act 1990, and faced with further complaints relating to odour and flies with reports of rats, which resulted in the council entering and carrying out works required to prevent the land from continuing to cause a nuisance. After these works were completed by the council this case was referred for prosecution.

  • Ms Loredana Barban of Clough Road, Hull failed to attend Hull Magistrates’ Court on 12 November 2021 and in her absence was convicted of an offence contrary to section 34(2A) Environmental Protection Act 1990 – resulting in fines and costs of £734 (£440 fine, £44 victim surcharge and costs to the council of £350).

    This case was brought forward by the council after CCTV evidence was obtained in May 2021. Due to complaints of regular fly tipping in the area and wastes being cleared by the council, additional mobile cameras were installed in the area.

    After evidence was obtained and a successful identification of the person, Miss Barban was issued with a fixed penalty notice for fly tipping.

    As Miss Barban failed to make payment of the fixed penalty issued by the Council or reply to further correspondence and the wastes having been cleared and disposed of by the Council, this case was referred to the Council’s Legal Team for prosecution.

  • Mr Ovidiu Florin Orica of Dorset Street, Hull failed to attend Hull Magistrates’ Court on the 12th November 2021 and was convicted in his absence to total fines and costs of £984 – a fine of £440, a victim surcharge of £44 and ordered to pay compensation and costs to the Council of £500.

    Hull City Council’s Environmental Enforcement Officers responded to complaints about the condition of Mr Orica’s property on Dorset Street, Hull in August 2021.

    Investigations revealed Mr Orica was failing to maintain the cleanliness of his property which gave rise to foul smells and flies, affecting other people neighbouring and within the local vicinity.

    After informal attempts to engage with Mr Orica proved unsuccessful, the Council issued a statutory notice requiring steps to be taken to prevent the land from causing a statutory nuisance.

    Mr Orica was served a legal notice in accordance with sections 79 and 80 Environmental Protection Act 1990, and faced with further complaints relating to odour and flies with reports of rats, which resulted in the council entering and carrying out works required to prevent the land from continuing to cause a nuisance. After these works were completed by the council this case was referred for prosecution.

  • Mr Mark Long (aged 32 years) of Fern Grove, Folkestone Street, Hull failed to attend Hull Magistrates’ Court on the 15th October 2021 and was convicted in his absence to total fines and costs of £1,301 (fine of £660, a victim surcharge of £66 and costs to the council of £575).

    The council responded to complaints about the condition of the property on Fern Grove and investigations revealed the level of uncleanliness was giving rise to foul smells and flies – affecting neighbours and those within the local vicinity.

    Informal attempts to engage with Mr Long proved unsuccessful and so a statutory notice was issued, requiring steps to be taken to prevent the land from causing a statutory nuisance.

    Mr Long was served with a legal notice in accordance with sections 79 and 80 Environmental Protection Act 1990. Faced with further complaints, he council entered the land to carry out required works to prevent nuisance. After these works were completed by the council this case was referred for prosecution. Costs were recovered as part of this prosecution.

  • Multiple Hull residents have been found responsible for fly tipping a range of items on Hawthorn Avenue, Reynoldson Street and Vermont Street – including a fridge, household waste and multiple bags of waste.

    In response to CCTV evidence obtained and clearance of the waste involved, further investigations were made resulting in payments of fixed penalty notices issued for fly tipping for all three cases.   

  • Hull City Council is continuing to warn residents not to abandoned vehicles.

Adam Wright of Dill Drive, Beverley was prosecuted and ordered by Hull Magistrates’ to pay total fines and costs of £1,289 for the unlawful abandonment of a vehicle on St Andrews Quay, Hull contrary to section 2(1)(a) Refuse Disposal (Amenity) Act 1978.

The council responded to complaints of an abandoned vehicle, and after evidence was obtained, Mr Wright was contacted. Following his failure to respond and further inspection of the vehicle, which revealed its condition had deteriorated, the council was satisfied it had been unlawfully abandoned.

The council’s contractor removed, and subsequently disposed of the vehicle. Correspondence was sent to Mr Wright, with necessary documents to pay the fine. Payment was not received and further correspondence was ignored, so this matter was referred for prosecution.

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