Spirit

Spirit

PRFire achieve national coverage for client’s 300 Year Old Chinese Spirit Recipe


PRFire once again gain first class press coverage for their client’s news story.

First it was beer that underwent a revolution. Then came gin (and let’s not forget the tonic it’s served with). Now China’s most ancient and popular spirit, baijiu (pronounced bye – joe), is busy being reinvented for western markets.

Baijiu is one of the biggest mysteries of the alcohol industry. Despite achieving total sales of 10.8 billion litres in 2018, which is more than whisky, vodka, gin, run and tequila combined, practically no one in the west has ever heard of it.

But a British entrepreneur is determined to change all that by launching a handcrafted baijiu distilled in the UK that he says is more than a match for the most prestigious state-owned Chinese brands.

V.I.P Jiu 8 is the brainchild of Irving Graham, a Chinese antiquities dealer from Newcastle. Back in 2014 Graham bid £300 for a cracked Chinese wine cup at an auction in southern England. He later discovered it was a piece from the Imperial Chinese collection once housed in the Forbidden City during the reign of the Kangxi Emperor between 1654-1722.

Irving went on to sell the cup for £28,000, but not before it offered up one last valuable secret – a handwritten note hidden in its wooden presentation box containing a 300 year-old recipe for an alcohol-based tonic known as a jiu. All nine ingredients had been specially chosen by the Emperor himself.

A few years later Graham embarked on a gruelling journey across Russia and China on the Trans-Siberian railway, keen to learn more about baijiu and its importance in Chinese culture.

He discovered that baijiu was once produced in thousands of small, family-owned distilleries throughout China until the Chinese Communist Party took over and set about shutting them down or merging them together to create state-run ‘mega distilleries’.Graham returned to the UK determined to resurrect the Kangxi Emperor’s recipe and create a craft baijiu distilled in Britain. He spent more than a year conducting intensive trials to get the balance of the ingredients just right.

“What I’ve created is a modern yet authentic Imperial craft baijiu made in Britain that embraces and celebrates the history and traditions of China’s favourite spirit”.

Irving admits convincing western drinkers to embrace baijiu, which was once famously described by celebrated US journalist Dan Rather as drinking liquid razor blades” can often be challenging.

Baijiu is undoubtedly an acquired taste, but as with anything the more you try it and learn about it the more you appreciate what an amazingly versatile drink it is.
“It’s a sad fact that a lot of the art of creating baijiu was lost when it was industrialized by the CCP. Today the huge mega brands blend batches and cut corners to produce a uniform product on a mind-boggling scale”.

“I’m committed to bringing the craft back to baijiu, only distilling small batches that are made by human hands and not machines.”

In fact Irving is so confident the Kangxi Emperor’s 300-year-old recipe is superior to the best Chinese brands available he sent a sample of it together with a sample from the famous Kweichow Moutai Distillery (from which rare bottles can fetch thousands of pounds at auction) to an accredited UK laboratory to have them analysed.

“Not only did they conclude that V.I.P Jiu 8 is more complex than the Moutai sample, it also contained many more compounds that have potentially positive health benefits,” he said.

For further information please contact:
EMAIL: admin@vipjiu8.com
WEBSITE: www.vipjiu8.com
FULL STORY: www.vipjiu8.com/full-story/

V.I.P Jiu 8 is Britain’s first authentic Imperial craft baijiu. It has been made according to a 300-year-old recipe found hidden with a cracked wine cup that once belonged to the Kangxi Emperor of China.

V.I.P Jiu 8 (58% ABV) is an extremely versatile baijiu; it can be drunk neat in small glasses in accordance with Chinese tradition or can be added to cocktails to give them an exhilarating new dimension.

After opening the bottle the first thing you’ll notice is the baijiu’s intense aroma, filled with hints of fresh mint and fennel. One sip reveals a complex interplay between flavours that shift between mandarin, nutmeg, citrus and saffron.

When making V.I.P Jiu 8 only the ‘heart’ of the alcohol produced during the distillation process is used. The heart is the purest, best-tasting part of the alcohol. By using only the heart all the poisons, fats and oils that lurk in the so-called heads and tails created when alcohol is distilled are discarded.

V.I.P Jiu 8 is now being sold to the UK on and off trades in a limited series of distinctively branded 700ml bottles.

PRFire have a talented in house team of journalists who know exactly how to tailor your news to make sure that it is featured in the right publications to fit your requirements. Please do get in touch for more information about our guaranteed publication promise.

Email: catherine@prfire.com

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UK Antiques Dealer Sells Cracked Cup For £28,000 Finds 300 Year Old Imperial Chinese Spirit Recipe


First it was beer that underwent a revolution. Then came gin (and let’s not forget the tonic it’s served with). Now China’s most ancient and popular spirit, baijiu (pronounced bye – joe), is busy being reinvented for western markets.

Baijiu is one of the biggest mysteries of the alcohol industry. Despite achieving total sales of 10.8 billion litres in 2018, which is more than whisky, vodka, gin, run and tequila combined, practically no one in the west has ever heard of it.

But a British entrepreneur is determined to change all that by launching a handcrafted baijiu distilled in the UK that he says is more than a match for the most prestigious state-owned Chinese brands.

V.I.P Jiu 8 is the brainchild of Irving Graham, a Chinese antiquities dealer from Newcastle. Back in 2014 Graham bid £300 for a cracked Chinese wine cup at an auction in southern England. He later discovered it was a piece from the Imperial Chinese collection once housed in the Forbidden City during the reign of the Kangxi Emperor between 1654-1722.

Irving went on to sell the cup for £28,000, but not before it offered up one last valuable secret – a handwritten note hidden in its wooden presentation box containing a 300 year-old recipe for an alcohol-based tonic known as a jiu. All nine ingredients had been specially chosen by the Emperor himself.

A few years later Graham embarked on a gruelling journey across Russia and China on the Trans-Siberian railway, keen to learn more about baijiu and its importance in Chinese culture.

He discovered that baijiu was once produced in thousands of small, family-owned distilleries throughout China until the Chinese Communist Party took over and set about shutting them down or merging them together to create state-run ‘mega distilleries’.

Graham returned to the UK determined to resurrect the Kangxi Emperor’s recipe and create a craft baijiu distilled in Britain. He spent more than a year conducting intensive trials to get the balance of the ingredients just right.

“What I’ve created is a modern yet authentic Imperial craft baijiu made in Britain that embraces and celebrates the history and traditions of China’s favourite spirit”.

Irving admits convincing western drinkers to embrace baijiu, which was once famously described by celebrated US journalist Dan Rather as drinking liquid razor blades” can often be challenging.

Baijiu is undoubtedly an acquired taste, but as with anything the more you try it and learn about it the more you appreciate what an amazingly versatile drink it is.
“It’s a sad fact that a lot of the art of creating baijiu was lost when it was industrialized by the CCP. Today the huge mega brands blend batches and cut corners to produce a uniform product on a mind-boggling scale”.

“I’m committed to bringing the craft back to baijiu, only distilling small batches that are made by human hands and not machines.”

In fact Irving is so confident the Kangxi Emperor’s 300-year-old recipe is superior to the best Chinese brands available he sent a sample of it together with a sample from the famous Kweichow Moutai Distillery (from which rare bottles can fetch thousands of pounds at auction) to an accredited UK laboratory to have them analysed.

“Not only did they conclude that V.I.P Jiu 8 is more complex than the Moutai sample, it also contained many more compounds that have potentially positive health benefits,” he said.

For further information please contact:
EMAIL: admin@vipjiu8.com
WEBSITE: www.vipjiu8.com
FULL STORY: www.vipjiu8.com/full-story/

V.I.P Jiu 8 is Britain’s first authentic Imperial craft baijiu. It has been made according to a 300-year-old recipe found hidden with a cracked wine cup that once belonged to the Kangxi Emperor of China.

V.I.P Jiu 8 (58% ABV) is an extremely versatile baijiu; it can be drunk neat in small glasses in accordance with Chinese tradition or can be added to cocktails to give them an exhilarating new dimension.

After opening the bottle the first thing you’ll notice is the baijiu’s intense aroma, filled with hints of fresh mint and fennel. One sip reveals a complex interplay between flavours that shift between mandarin, nutmeg, citrus and saffron.

When making V.I.P Jiu 8 only the ‘heart’ of the alcohol produced during the distillation process is used. The heart is the purest, best-tasting part of the alcohol. By using only the heart all the poisons, fats and oils that lurk in the so-called heads and tails created when alcohol is distilled are discarded.

V.I.P Jiu 8 is now being sold to the UK on and off trades in a limited series of distinctively branded 700ml bottles.

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Bara Brith Gin – Snowdonia Spirit Company makes first ever gin celebrating the Welsh favourite tea loaf, Bara Brith.


Now for the first time there is a very special new addition, Bara Brith Gin. A beautiful expression of the unique recipe of the Welsh tea loaf and a recipe that lends it’s self very much to a spirit version.

Dried and candied fruits, aromas of sweet orange and spice and subtle background flavours of tea all contribute to this new Welsh gin, distilled in the heart of Wales.

Bara Brith has had a special place in the hearts of generations of Welsh bakers, whether it be on special occasions or for that delicious, just baked aroma and taste, this traditional Welsh tea loaf is very much a national Welsh icon.

Bara Brith, translated as speckled bread, has a rich recipe of dried fruits, spices and tea and bakers would often vary slightly the ingredient mix and it is said that there are 1000 different recipes, but only one Bara Brith.

Bara Brith Gin is indeed very much on trend, with the flavoured gin market experiencing a huge increase in demand, especially in the last 12 months, with reports of gin sales topping 73 million bottles to year end June 2019 in the UK, up nearly 10 million bottles on the previous year and the flavoured gins sector growing the fastest.

With five consecutive years of double digit growth gin is still the fastest growing category in total alcohol and the drinkers interest in new gin flavours shows no sign of slowing down with both retailers and bars significantly increasing their gin offering.

New flavours bring new cocktails and new drinkers too, all throughly enjoying the great new tastes that were just not on offer 5 years ago.

The Snowdonia Spirit Company, makers of Love Spoon Wild Fruit Gin and their signature Welsh Gin, say that flavour innovation is the key to the success of their full strength gin selection, Welsh gins celebrating tradition with great taste and Bara Brith Gin certainly delivers.

The label is quite special too. Renown environmental landscape artist Alan Rankle has created a special painting for the reverse of the Bara Brith Gin label. Alan’s interpretation of the Welsh landscape is evocative and wild and is part of a series of paintings commissioned by the Snowdonia Spirit Co to adorn their gin labels.

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